Posts Tagged ‘Strategy’

Be prepared

June 10, 2011

How to Plan the Perfect Dinner Party by Kevin Dooley
One of my favourite pastimes is to watch elite sport, usually on TV but once in a while if I’m lucky live. The genuine action, drama and unpredictability of sports like football, cricket and rugby is what really captivates me, but as a business and marketing professional I often think about the professionalism and hard work that goes into top sporting teams.

The planning and preparation that goes into making a great sports team is phenomenal, with the entire squad, back-room staff and management meticulously plotting the steps they must take to achieve success. But alas, like many, I am not a professional sportsman. However, I have taken away a number of things from the sportting world that can be applied to business, too.

Effective planning and preparation will bring individuals and businesses the following benefits:

Provide direction

A good plan will give you direction, as well as a goal, a set of objectives and a strategy to reach them.

Allocate resources

Planning gives you the opportunity to forecast what you might need to meet your objectives.

Reduce uncertainties

Planning and preparation allows you to assess what problems may or may not exist and give you the chance to put strategies in place to tackle them.

Anticipate action

One can’t assume what the competition is doing or how the market will react. Make an educated assessment of what actions you might have to take based on a set of different scenarios.

Facilitate assessment

Following any action, assess how you’ve performed. By planning ahead you can work out how, what and when to make those assessments and put a framework in place to make it happen.

Make good decisions

The more information you have, the better prepared you’ll be to use that knowledge to make the right decisions and give yourself the best possible chance of success.

For more on this subject as well marketing, social media and digital communications, please visit One Too Many Mornings.

What’s behind the numbers?

March 26, 2011

Facebook's Domination by infographiclabs
Last week I spoke with the managing director and marketing director of an online publication company looking to use social media as part of a digital expansion programme. It was encouraging to speak with two senior managers who have clearly recognised the opportunities and benefits that social media can offer and are prepared to use new media channels as part of their company’s marketing mix.

However, one of the things that concerned me during our meeting was when they said one of their main social media objectives was to boost the number of ‘likes’ on their Facebook page from around 9,000 to 1 million within a four to six month period and that ‘scale’ was of particular importance to them.

Bigger is not always better

A large following, whether that be through ‘likes’ on Facebook or followers on Twitter, is a perfectly legitimate social media marketing metric. Amongst other things, a large following will give you a fantastic opportunity to market to your existing customer base and help you establish credible social capital. But when this is one of the only social media marketing metrics, one begins to worry. It may be a cliché , but quality really is more important than quantity when it comes to (effective) social media marketing. You may grow your following and boast over a million ‘likes’ on Facebook, but so what?

Social media is a paradigm shift from traditional marketing techniques and requires a different type of thinking. It involves bringing the audience into the marketing process by including them in conversations, engaging with them and starting a dialogue. Social media marketing will not be effective if you build up a following only to broadcast messages and advertisements to them in the traditional one-to-many fashion. You need to proactively target your key social media audiences and give them a compelling reason to connect with you.

It’s not just the size – it’s what you do with it that counts!

One million Facebook ‘likes’ would be great, but what if only 25% of the Facebook following really liked you and the majority were disengaged with the brand and unresponsive to the discourse you’re trying to generate? Surely it would be better to aim for 20,000 Facebook fans who are interested and enthusiastic about your product or service and form part of a community that regularly interacts with your content and spreads it organically across their social graphs. Only this way will you begin to see increased conversions, be it actionable clicks over page views, enquiries, leads or sales. These are the metrics that really matter the most.

What are your thoughts on social media marketing metrics? What do you use to measure success? What does good social media look like?

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Photo credit: Inforgraphic by Infographiclabs. To view the full picture click on the picture or alternatively click here.

All or nothing

March 21, 2011

All or nothing
All too often I speak to individuals or companies who are considering using social media as part of their marketing efforts and yet they haven’t got a clear idea as to how it will fit into an overall plan or strategy.

I truly believe that social media marketing can be a very valuable part of a company’s marketing tool kit. But as with any other tactic or communication channel, it needs to be integrated into the overall business or marketing strategy effectively, with clear goals, objectives and milestones in place. Creating a one-off Facebook page or Twitter steam without an endgame in mind is simply using social media as a marketing ‘add on’, separated from from the core values, personality and image the brand is aiming to portray. Consistency is key and social media plays a vital role in generating brand awareness across both the traditional and social web.

Unless you are prepared to commit to social media entirely and use it as a genuine part of your marketing plan then I would recommend that social media isn’t used at all. Many may say that this would be far too drastic and that not participating in any social media channels would be a backwards step. However, the consequences of poor social media implantation has the potential to be much more damaging, with the possibility of frustrating followers or even customers through inconsistent participation and tone of voice.

A social media strategy doesn’t have to be a weighty tome, but it does have to coherently map out why you want to use social media, how you are going to use it and with whom. If you’re not prepared to take the time to put a simple plan together, I doubt you’ll have the time to consistently engage with communities using social media. It’s better to focus on the channels you can use really well (whether they be online or offline) and add value, rather than spread yourself – and your brand – thin across a variety of social media sites where you rarely turn up and join in.